Road Safety Tips

“EVEN THOUGH NO TYPE OF DEATH IS ENVIABLE, IT IS BETTER TO DIE IN COMFORT THAN TO BE CUT TO DEATH IN BITS LIKE A BULL SLAUGHTERD FOR MERRY MAKING”- Kelechi Ngwaba , B.Sc,MBA,ACCA, MARCH 2006

SAFETY HABITS FOR DRIVERS

The Acronym

The safety habits for driver’s exposed in this discourse are represented by the acronym:

D, A, S2, C, O, A, T2, C, O4, W, D2,

DAS2 COA3 TCO3 WD is one of the longest acronym’s dedicated to ensuring safety on our high ways and local trunks. It has gone steps beyond safety exposures discussed by safety experts in Nigeria and beyond.

Skeletal Definitions

D - Do not DAY DREAM
A - Rapt ATTENTION
S - Maintain SHARP REFLEXES
S - Use SEAT BELTS
C - Proper CHAIR POSITIONING
O - Do not imbibe OKADA MENTALITY
A - AVOID too much discussion
A - AVOID too much quietness (use NO NAP)
A - AVOID answering or making phone calls
T - Know that your car is not a TOY
T - Effective use of TRAFFICATORS (see FRSC guides)
C - Avoid COMPETITIONS while driving
O - Avoid OVER CONFIDENCE
O - Do not OVER SPEED
O - Do not OVER LOAD
O - OBEY traffics rules and road signs (see FRSC guides)
W - Forget your WORRIES while driving
D - Glance at DASHBOARD occasionally
D - Avoid DRUGS AND ALCHOHOLIC BEVERAGES before or while driving

10 TIPS FOR NIGHT DRIVING

In as much as the NO NAP Anti Drowsy Alert System is a good product, it must be emphasized here that it is not the only therapy to fatigued driving. Fatigued driving should be avoided as much as possible. Traffic death rates are three times greater at night than during the day, yet many, especially luxury bus drivers are unaware of night driving special hazards or don’t know effective ways to deal with them. It is on record at the FRSC that 75% of all night accidents are caused by sleep. So in this web page, we are going to highlight on 10 tips of night driving.

Driving at night is more dangerous than during the day. One of the obvious reasons is darkness. 90 percent of driver’s reaction depends on vision, and vision is severely limited at night. Depth perception, color recognition and peripheral vision are compromised after sundown. Fatigue also adds to the danger of night driving. Drowsiness makes driving more difficult by dulling concentration and slowing reaction time. Also, alcohol is the single most significant factor in fatal traffic crashes, playing a part in more than half of all motor vehicle – related deaths. That makes weekend nights more dangerous. More fatal crashes take place on Friday and Saturday than at any other time in the week.

Effective measures to minimize these after – dark dangers can be taken by preparing your car and following special guidelines while you drive:

  • Prepare your car for night driving
  • Clean headlights, taillights, signal light and windows once a week, more often if necessary.
  • Aim your headlights properly. Misaimed headlights blind other drivers and reduce your ability to see the road.

1. DON’T DRINK AND DRIVE:

Not only does alcohol severely impair your driving ability, but it also acts as a depressant. Just one drink can induce fatigue. Avoid smoking when you drive. Smoke’s nicotine and carbon monoxide hamper night vision. Turn your headlight on if there are any doubts. Lights will help you see better in early twilight, but they’ll make easier for other drivers to see you. Being seen is as important as you seeing. Reducing your speed and increase your following distances. It is more difficult to judge other vehicle’s speeds and distances at night. Don’t overdrive your headlights. You should be able to stop inside the illuminated area. If you’re not, you are creating a blind crash area in front of your vehicle. Keep your headlights on low beams when following another vehicle so you don’t blind the driver ahead of you. If an oncoming vehicle doesn’t lower beams from high to low, avoid glare by watching the right edge of the road and using it as a steering guide.

If you have car trouble, pull off the road as far as possible. Warn approaching traffic at once by setting up flares or reflecting triangles near your vehicle and 300 feet behind it. Turn on flashes and the dome light.

2. OBSERVE NIGHT DRIVING SAFETY AS SOON AS THE SUN GOES DOWN:

Your eyes are adapting to the constant change in amount of light put on your driving light. Twilight is one of the most difficult time to drive.

3. HAVE A CLEAR HEAD:

Make sure you always have a clear head before deciding to operate a motor vehicle. Alcohol and certain drugs, both illegal and legal, can severally impair you driving skills. Many prescription and over – the count medications can cause dangerous drowsiness. Get a good night’s rest and don’t drive for long stretches without a break. If you are tired, don’t risk the safety of yourself and others on the highway by trying to drive. Designate a driver or choose another means of transportation such a taxicab or public transport.

4. LIMIT DRIVING ALONE WHEN TIRED:

Driving with someone else in your vehicle, can increase your overall alertness. It is well recognized that when driving deprived and at night, your chances of a crash are dramatically increased.

5. READ THE LABELS:

If you are taking any medications, be sure to read and obey the warning labels. If the label says the medication cause drowsiness, do not drive . Heed to the warning as it is there for a reason. Consult with your doctor or pharmacist if you have any.

6. PLAN AHEAD:

Allow yourself plenty of extra time to reach your destination and allow for emergencies or traffic jams. In today’s busy world, most of us are in a hurry to get where we are going. By allowing extra time we can be more relaxed when operating our vehicles and thereby cut down on the incidences of road rage, such as excessive speeding, tailgating and weaving in and out between cars.

7. RELAX:

Avoid aggressive driving by relaxing and having patience. By not being such in a rush to reach your destination you will be a calmer person and won’t need to speed and run red lights. A yellow light means slow down not speed up. Always stop at red light.

8. BE ALERT TO SIGNS OF FATIGUE:

If you start to feel tired when driving pull over in a safe area and let someone else drive. If you are alone, pull into a safe location such as a well – lit rest stop and take short nap or get out of the car and walk around for a few minutes. Stop as often as necessary. When traveling on long trips, eat light food. Large, heavy meals can make you drowsy.

9. PRACTICE COMMON SENSE SAFETY RULES:

Always wear your safety belt and make sure all your passengers are buckled properly, even on short trips. If traveling with children, educate yourself on the many kinds of child safety seats and restraints. Choose which system is best for your child and always follow the direction. Make sure children ages 12 and under are always buckled up in the back seat, the safest place to ride.

10. KEEP YOUR EYES ON THE ROAD:

Avoid taking your eyes off the road by eliminating any possible distractions ahead of time. Before setting out to drive, be sure that important items are within easy reach, i.e. directions and maps, sunglasses etc. reduce to minimum possibly dangerous diversions of your attention from the task of safe driving, such as changing tapes or compact discs and always pull over at a safe place to use your cellular telephone.